Pet Friendly Report — Lake Tawakoni, Thousand Trails, TX

If you have a Thousand Trails membership, this is an ideal spot for a weekend or a month.  If you don’t, you are probably wondering what all the fuss is.  In the Thousand Trails system, the word “resort” is used loosely.  These campgrounds are a great value if you are a passport member because it comes to about $14 a day if you have the kind of membership I have.  If you are not a member, rates can be extremely high and not competitive and you will wonder what all the hoopla is about.  This campground, and typical of most Thousand Trails resorts, has dated infrastructure and between 1/3 and 1/2 of the spots are taken by “annual” sites and permanent residents.  Some people don’t like that and I would recommend finding a high end resort or a state campground, depending on your preferences.  And none of the Thousand Trails has 100% full hookups so you have to scramble a little when it’s a busy weekend.

The reason I love Thousand Trails, and I’ll use this resort as an example, is that they are dog-friendly and because they aren’t as fancy, I feel I can relax more.  It’s kind of a live and let live policy but you have to take the good with the bad.  For example, there are some people that just don’t believe in scooping the poop.  I’ve never had to deal with loudness or partying at any TT resort and I’ve been a member for 3 years.

The amenities are usually dated so don’t expect fancy.  The laundry room works well, I never checked the bathrooms or showers.  This TT has 2 swimming pools, one is adult only, which is a good thing if you’d rather not be surrounded by little ones.  There is a clubhouse at one end and a marina at the other end with another facility for parties, etc.

My favorite amenity here was the trails through the woods.  There were myriad trails, intimate but large enough for a golf cart or 3-wheel bicycle.  I had fun zooming around with the dogs but never quite figured out the maze.  Never got bored though.  20180731_111104We even found a wayward box turtle in the middle of the path one early morning that was being harassed by a heron.  I made sure he wasn’t injured then put him back farther in the bushes.  He was a happy camper.  The next morning, the dogs and I saw our first ever armadillo.  I wanted to watch him for awhile scampering back and forth looking for food, but the dogs were very high strung, whining and wanting to get him so I had to leave after a few minutes.

The roads are rather terrible in that they are rutted and in dire need of repair.  That being said, they were fine for finding a spot and parking.  And they didn’t affect all the golf carts or bicycles that were puttering back and forth all day.  This isn’t the kind of lake you swim in but Lake Tawakoni was named Catfish Capital of Texas a while back.  It’s a very large lake and the TT Resort is just on a small piece of it.

I liked the spot we picked and all the spaces are really huge.  Some other parks would have 4 campers packed into the space that TT Lake Tawakoni allots for one camper.  As we were walking one day, I took a photo of 4 or 5 premium looking spots20180729_1600572738537713126472480.jpg right on the water with great views.  Interestingly enough, none of these spots had sewer hookups so they were not being used.

Positives

  • If you have a membership, it’s free to camp here
  • very large spaces and lots to choose from
  • All the amenities — pool, laundry, showers, marina
  • Lots of walking trails through the woods and lots of roads to walk on if you don’t want to be in the woods
  • Dog run (unfenced) and manicured open fields for playing
  • All the full timers have their lots fixed up really nicely with patio furniture, decorations, and fire pits
  • Wildlife

Negatives

  • Roads in need of repair
  • About 20-25% of the sites had “closed for repairs” signs on them
  • No store
  • Really dusty with no grass growing in the camping areas
  • Heavy rains can turn it into a muddy mess very quickly20180729_0643381751783304300042654.jpg